Where is My Power Steering Fluid Going?

Power Steering FluidIt can be frustrating loosing something.  You know at one point you had it in your possession, but now you have no idea where it is, and no matter where you look for it you just can’t figure out where it went.  Maybe it was the television remote, or your car keys.  Maybe for you it was your power steering fluid.  Whether it was the telltale whining noise that gave it away, a sudden loss of power steering in while you were driving, or you simply noticed your power steering fluid level was low during a regular check, it can be frustrating finding a low fluid level without having any prior indications of a leak.  Regular maintenance checks can help keep low fluid levels from sneaking up on you.  For more things you should be regularly checking on your vehicle, checkout out our series on routine maintenance that starts with an article about what you should check every week.

If you find yourself wondering where you power steering fluid has gone, there is only one possibility.  You’ve got a leak somewhere in your power steering system.  It is not unusual to have a leak in your power steering system to go unnoticed.  Your power steering system operates at high pressures so a leak in your system will likely only leak while your vehicle is running and the system is pressurized.  Since power steering fluid usually only leaks while your engine is running, the drips can often land on the road or be blown back under the engine of your car not leaving any puddles or spots on your driveway or in your parking spots.  Also, the components where a leak is possible are all located very low on your vehicle and can often be over looked when you are checking under your hood.  Lastly, dirty power steering fluid can look very similar to dirty engine oil and a power steering fluid leak can easily be mistaken for an engine oil leak.

It is not unusual to develop a power steering fluid leak at the seals in your steering rack or steering gear.  The motion of shafts through the seals can cause them to wear out over time.  Also, since the seals are located low in the front of your vehicle they are regular exposed to road dirt, sand and salt in the winter making them prone to leaks.  Also, the high pressure fluid in you power steering system is carried through a combination of hard metal lines and rubber hoses.  The rubber hoses allow the power steering pump to move and flex with your engine as it shifts during acceleration and deceleration and the metal lines allow for cooling of the power steering fluid.  Leaks can also form at the union of the soft rubber hose and the hard metal line due to vibrations and flexing of the rubber hose.

Power Steering FluidReplacing power steering lines and seals can be a very complicated job.  Often they are routed in very difficult to reach areas of your engine bay and can be covered by other components or even the sub frame of the vehicle.  Replacing the leaking component can be either a very time consuming project, or a very expensive maintenance item.

The best course of action for disappearing power steering fluid is to add BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak to your power steering reservoir next time you top it off.  BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak is a specially formulated stop leak additive that will revitalize the seals and hoses in your power steering system to seal your leak and restore your power steering system to normal operation.  BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak does not have any particulates that can clog your system and is safe to stay in your power steering system for the life of your vehicle.

BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak

You can purchase BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak directly from BlueDevil Here: Power Steering Stop Leak

You can also purchase BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak from any of our partnering local auto parts stores like:

  • AutoZone
  • Advance Auto Parts
  • Bennett Auto Supply
  • CarQuest Auto parts
  • NAPA Auto Parts
  • O’Reilly Auto Parts
  • Pep Boys
  • Fast Track
  • Bumper to Bumper Auto Parts Specialists
  • S&E Quick Lube Distributer
  • DYK Automotive

Pictures provided by:

Power Steering Fluid – by Brian Snelson Licensed by Creative Commons Share Alike 3.0 Via Flikr – Original Link

18 responses to “Where is My Power Steering Fluid Going?

  1. Does power steering fluid leak to the ground? My car is dripping oil on the ground. I don’t know whether it is transmission or power fluid but we have to top the power steering fluid occassionally when it is below max level.

    1. Taiwo-

      In order to use one of our products you will first need to pinpoint whether you are losing fluid from the power steering unit or your transmission. Once you are able to do so you can use the appropriate product; either the BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak or the BlueDevil Transmission Sealer.

      Feel free to contact us at 888-863-0426 with any questions.

      Thanks!

      -BDP

    1. Saip-

      Yes, you can use the BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak in your Honda Civic. You will add 1/3 of the bottle to your power steering reservoir. Feel free to contact our technical support line at 888-863-0426 with any other questions.

      Thank you!

      -BDP

    1. April-

      Yes, the BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak is compatible with your Nissan Quest. Feel free to contact our technical support line at 888-863-0426 with any other questions.

      Thank you!

      -BDP

    1. JR-

      Yes, BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak is compatible and safe to use in your Mercedes. You should add 1/3 of a bottle to treat the system. Expect to start seeing results after about 100 miles of driving.

      Thank you!

      -BDP

    1. Tony-

      Yes! The BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak is compatible with your Ford 3 ton truck. You will be adding 1/3 of the bottle into the power steering reservoir and should expect to see results after about 100-200 miles of driving.

      Thank you!

      -BDP

  2. Do I need to add power steering fluid before adding 1/3 bottle of BlueDevil? The directions seem to indicate that I should use BlueDevil without adding more power steering fluid and keep doing so until the leak has stopped.

    1. Adib-

      Yes, you should have the proper amount of power steering fluid in the system, prior to adding the product. If the fluid is already at capacity, you would want to drain enough out in order to add the recommended amount of the product. Typically, you will start to see results after about 100-200 miles of driving. You may top the system off with power steering fluid as needed, however, you wouldn’t add more of the product unless you were at around the 200 mile mark and were still noticing a leak. Feel free to contact our technical support line at 888-863-0426 with any other questions.

      Hope this helps!

      -BDP

    1. Jayson-

      Yes, the BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak is compatible with your Nissan Maxima. Feel free to contact our technical support line at 888-863-0426 with any other questions.

      Thank you!

      -BDP

  3. Can i use this Power Steering Stop Leak on a manual 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser…pretty sure its leaking somewhere as I added fluid a couple of weeks ago and its already making the tell tale noise!!!

    1. Celeste-

      Yes, the BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak is safe to use on your Chrysler PT Cruiser with manual transmission. You will be adding 1/3 of the bottle into your power steering reservoir and should expect to see results after about 100-200 miles of drving.

      Thank you!

      -BDP

  4. My GMC Acadia loses its power steering fluid within hours. Two different mechanics thought it was the rack and pinion system so I had them replace it but it is still leaking. If these fools cannot discover the problem, is this product strong or effective enough to stop what appears to be a significant leak and is it compatible with the Acadia?

    1. Rr-

      The BlueDevil Power Steering Stop Leak is compatible with your GMC Acadia, however, it is not really intended for significant leaks. Typically, you would start to see results after about 100-200 miles of driving. If you are losing fluid too quickly, you would be losing the product just as quickly, and wouldn’t really be able to keep it in the system long enough in order to get the benefit of using it. A hard part repair may be your best option.

      Thank you!

      -BDP

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